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MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) articles

Displaying 1 - 18 of 18

Wireless communication breaks through water-air barrier

Wireless communication breaks through water-air barrier
MIT researchers have taken a step toward solving a longstanding challenge with wireless communication: direct data transmission between underwater and airborne devices. Today, underwater sensors cannot share data with those on land, as both use different wireless signals that only work in their respective mediums. Radio signals that travel through air die very rapidly in water. Acoustic signals, or sonar, sent by underwater devices mostly reflect off the surface without ever breaking through.
22nd August 2018

Encryption techniques protect cloud-based machine learning

Encryption techniques protect cloud-based machine learning
A novel encryption method devised by MIT researchers secures data used in online neural networks, without dramatically slowing their runtimes. This approach holds promise for using cloud-based neural networks for medical-image analysis and other applications that use sensitive data. Outsourcing machine learning is a rising trend in industry.
21st August 2018

Molecular clock could improve smartphone navigation

Molecular clock could improve smartphone navigation
MIT researchers have developed the first molecular clock on a chip, which uses the constant, measurable rotation of molecules — when exposed to a certain frequency of electromagnetic radiation — to keep time. The chip could one day significantly improve the accuracy and performance of navigation on smartphones and other consumer devices. Today’s most accurate time-keepers are atomic clocks.
23rd July 2018


Chip reduces consumption of public-key encryption by 99.75%

Chip reduces consumption of public-key encryption by 99.75%
  Most sensitive web transactions are protected by public-key cryptography, a type of encryption that lets computers share information securely without first agreeing on a secret encryption key. Public-key encryption protocols are complicated, and in computer networks, they’re executed by software.
13th February 2018

Andorra becomes a 'living lab' for urban innovation research

Andorra becomes a 'living lab' for urban innovation research
Researchers have developed CityScope Andorra, a 3D augmented-reality platform that visualises complex urban data on a small-scale model of the country in real-time. The platform simulates the impact of multiple urban interventions — from urban planning proposals to shared autonomous vehicles — and facilitates civic engagement and decision making.
13th October 2017

Wearable unveils consumer emotions

Wearable unveils consumer emotions
Humans experience a range of emotions in response to products and experiences on a daily basis. Shoppers may get excited for certain brands and then overwhelmed by choices. Audience members may oscillate between apathy and engagement during performances. Children can become frustrated, bored, or entertained while learning a new subject.
13th July 2017

Wireless power could enable ingestible electronics

Wireless power could enable ingestible electronics
Researchers at MIT, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory have devised a way to wirelessly power small electronic devices that can linger in the digestive tract indefinitely after being swallowed. Such devices could be used to sense conditions in the gastrointestinal tract, or carry small reservoirs of drugs to be delivered over an extended period.
27th April 2017

System links related data scattered across digital files

System links related data scattered across digital files
The age of big data has seen a host of new techniques for analysing large data sets. But before any of those techniques can be applied, the target data has to be aggregated, organised, and cleaned up. That turns out to be a shockingly time-consuming task. In a 2016 survey, 80 data scientists told the company CrowdFlower that, on average, they spent 80% of their time collecting and organising data and only 20% analysing it.
20th January 2017

Measuring exposure to pollution through your phone

Measuring exposure to pollution through your phone
What’s the best way to measure human exposure to urban pollution? Typically, cities do so by studying air-quality levels in fixed places. New York City, for example, has an extensive monitoring network that measures air quality in 155 locations. But now a study led by MIT researchers, focused on New York City, suggests that using mobile-phone data to track people’s movement provides an even deeper picture of exposure to pollution in urban settings.
2nd September 2016

Inferring urban travel patterns from cellphone data

Inferring urban travel patterns from cellphone data
In making decisions about infrastructure development and resource allocation, city planners rely on models of how people move through their cities, on foot, in cars, and on public transportation. Those models are largely based on surveys of residents’ travel habits. But conducting surveys and analysing their results is costly and time consuming: A city might go more than a decade between surveys. 
31st August 2016

Solving network congestion

Solving network congestion
There are few things more frustrating than trying to use your phone on a crowded network. With phone usage growing faster than wireless spectrum, we’re all now fighting over smaller and smaller bits of bandwidth. Spectrum crunch is such a big problem that the White House is getting involved, recently announcing both a $400m research initiative and a $4m global competition devoted to the issue.
26th August 2016

When to get your head out of the game

When to get your head out of the game
Head injuries are a hot topic today in sports medicine, with numerous studies pointing to a high prevalence of sports-related concussions, both diagnosed and undiagnosed, among youth and professional athletes. Now an MIT-invented tool is aiding in detecting and diagnosing concussions, in real time. 
16th August 2016

DuoSkin: From touchscreen to touchskin?

DuoSkin: From touchscreen to touchskin?
Tattoos which contain your music? On-skin jewellery that can control your smartphone? Pay for your coffee with your elbow? …Sound a touch far fetched? A group of students from MIT Media Lab and Microsoft Research have developed prototypes of on-skin user interfaces, which resemble jewellery.
15th August 2016

A wireless and wearable toxic-gas detector

A wireless and wearable toxic-gas detector
MIT researchers have developed low-cost chemical sensors, made from chemically altered carbon nanotubes, that enable smartphones or other wireless devices to detect trace amounts of toxic gases. Using the sensors, the researchers hope to design lightweight, inexpensive RFID badges to be used for personal safety and security. Such badges could be worn by soldiers on the battlefield to rapidly detect the presence of chemical weapons and by people who work around hazardous chemicals prone to leakage.
30th June 2016

WiFi that locates you

WiFi that locates you
We’ve all been there, impatiently twiddling our thumbs while trying to locate a WiFi signal. But what if, instead, the WiFi could locate us? According to researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), it could mean safer drones, smarter homes and password-free WiFi.
6th April 2016

Wristband detects and alerts for seizures

Wristband detects and alerts for seizures
People with epilepsy suffer from recurrent, unprovoked seizures that can cause injury and even death from "sudden unexpected death in epilepsy" (SUDEP), a condition that occurs minutes after a seizure ends. Now Empatica, co-founded by MIT professor and wearables pioneer Rosalind Picard, has developed a medical-quality consumer wristband, called Embrace, that monitors stress signals to detect potentially deadly seizures and alert wearers and caregivers, so they can intervene.
10th March 2016

RFID chip is virtually impossible to hack

RFID chip is virtually impossible to hack
Researchers at MIT and Texas Instruments have developed a new type of RFID chip that is virtually impossible to hack. If such chips were widely adopted, it could mean that an identity thief couldn’t steal your credit card number or key card information by sitting next to you at a café and high-tech burglars couldn’t swipe expensive goods from a warehouse and replace them with dummy tags.
8th February 2016

From wearables to ‘ingestibles’

From wearables to ‘ingestibles’
Ways in which we measure our health and well-being have become increasingly portable in recent years, with significant advances in wearable technology such as heart monitors, fitness trackers, smartwatches and other related gadgets. The release of technology such as the Fitbit, the Jawbone, Samsung Gear, the Garmin Forerunner 620, and the Apple Watch have all helped put personal data at our fingertips.
20th November 2015


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